Making progress

It’s a fact; when writing, an author always comes up against obstacles. Some of these can be relatively small things, easily resolved. Coming up with the ‘just right’ name of a town, or character, for instance. Other things are more weighty; trying to figure out how to get from point A to point C when point B is eluding you. Some time and thought will eventually solve that issue. Then there are those things that you know are in dire need of revising, reworking. You have the notes, the ideas, you know what changes need to be made, but you just can’t bring yourself to do it, because the early draft of that scene or chapter provokes cringes you didn’t think were humanly possible. What to do?

I’ve been running up against that last situation for a while now. I had a scene, a rather important scene, nay, a very important scene, the first draft of which, in retrospect, was trash. Embarrassingly bad trash. A few months ago, I made changes to the very beginning of the chapter, that was the easy part, but every time I attempted to work on what followed, I managed to find something else to do. Finally, I bit the bullet. I decided no matter how painful, no matter how many times I might wince or roll my eyes in disgust, I had to do the work, distasteful as it would be.

I took advantage of the four-day holiday weekend. After catching up with small edits to preceding chapters, I confronted my nemesis, my personal Goliath. I was determined to get a workable, readable draft of the chapter before the weekend was out. And I did it, finishing up late Christmas afternoon. When I read the early draft, written years ago, I realized it had a crudeness and ugliness to it that may have worked, initially, but the story has evolved into something else. Something far better, and the revisions I made completely change the tone of the scene, so it now aligns with both my overall vision and other existing chapters, not to mention, it dovetails perfectly with the following scene, a pivotal point in the book that ends the chapter.

By the end of the three day endeavor, I was exhausted, but it was worth the undertaking. Slaying that giant, moving that boulder blocking my path, sorting through the clutter of words, keeping what was useful and discarding the rest, was a great way to wrap up the year.

 

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