Two projects and KDP

I’ve been at something of a stand still with the novel for several months. As a result, I focused on other things as a means to avoid and procrastinate. Recently, however, I started focusing on a second project that, frankly, is a mess. I spent a good amount of time doing some brainstorming and dictating notes, and I’m happy to say the new material and direction is very much to my liking. Of course, with this being another very old story under heavy revision, there’s a lot of old material that needs to be discarded.

I may have mentioned before that when one of my manuscripts gets to be a little long, I order proof copies. Full disclosure: I’m a slow writer and write longer novels so the page and word count gets up there. When figuring the cost of material (reams of paper, inkjet cartridges) and time needed to print, it’s not economical to print a copy from my computer. In fact, for the price of about two reams of paper, or a little less than half of one inkjet cartridge for my printer model, I can get a proof copy in less than a week.

Some have complained lately about lengthy wait times for proofs from KDP, especially since CreateSpace is in its death throes — or perhaps they’re already planning the funeral. Here’s my recent experience.

Over the Thanksgiving holiday, I wanted to order a proof each for my still-working-on-it novel Iniquitous Desires, and another book I’m planning. The second one is an amalgam of the story’s first incarnation, portions of another, abandoned, story, and new notes. I ran into an issue with Iniquitous (which I detail below), but the other book upload went off without a hitch. I requested a proof and waited until the following day, Black Friday, to order (TIP: if you don’t want a paltry $9.00 or $10.00 charge on your credit card, buy an Amazon gift card and use that to purchase your proof.) The order confirmation said I’d receive my book the following Thursday. Fair enough. Imagine my surprise when I had an e-mail Monday morning saying the proof had shipped and would be delivered Tuesday. And, sure enough, it arrived.

On all my previous books, my play and the episode guides, I opted for glossy covers. When I ordered my first proof of Iniquitous from CreateSpace early this year, I chose matte. I went with matte for this new title as well and, although everybody and their cousin insists glossy is gauche, it has its merits. Observe:

Notice what appear to be white smudges? That’s after handling the book for maybe a half hour. Matte is not a dark color’s friend. The red also reads better in a photo for some reason than when holding the physical book. This cover was submitted with a CMYK color profile (something that’s necessary when using Ingram Spark, at 240% TAC no less, which deadens the color even more). KDP is more flexible. You can upload a cover in RGB and they’ll do their best to color match when converting to CMYK, usually with good results (some colors, like vibrant blues or purples turn out terrible). Here’s the cover in RGB (font change pending):

Corvid Cover copy

Snazzy, huh? Next time I order a proof, it will be glossy to compare. Now, about that Iniquitous proof…

As I mentioned, I had ordered a proof for ID through CreateSpace at the beginning of the year, then left it as a draft. Somewhere around March or April, while I was madly updating the episode guides, CreateSpace was in the beginning of its downward spiral. The writing was on the wall for anyone paying attention. Fed up with books being suppressed and requests to prove rights, I began moving my small catalog over to KDP. It was a painless process, but the only thing I couldn’t do was transfer my ID draft. I didn’t view it as a problem since I wasn’t using a free ISBN. I closed my CreateSpace account.

Last week, as I merrily set up the title on KDP, I hit a snag. KDP kept throwing up an error message that the ISBN I was entering was a CreateSpace owned number. It most certainly was not. Unfortunately, despite my best efforts and some muttered profanity, I couldn’t continue setting up my book. KDP politely kept asking me to fix the errors so it could process my title. I sent them a message, explaining about the previous draft and my inability to transfer it at the time I closed the account, and that the ISBN was from my imprint. I received a prompt reply, sympathetic to my plight, and assurances the web and tech team would be put on it and I’d hear back in two to three days. Since it was a long holiday weekend, I allowed for extra time.

Surprisingly, I received an e-mail on Monday from the same customer support person informing me the situation had been resolved, and it had been. My most up-to-date proof of ID should arrive early next week. At the last second, before submitting the request for a proof, I backtracked and changed the cover to glossy. We’ll see how it looks.

The most interesting thing is that now that I have a tangible, albeit chaotic, version of Scarlet Corvid to look through, I’m now more interested in working on Iniquitous. I suppose it’s a mind-game, a little psychological trick I play with myself to get motivated. Iniquitous is actually in fairly good shape compared to the shambles of Corvid. Sorting out the disarray in SC can give my mind a break from ID, and ID will be, for the most part, an orderly respite from the insanity of SC.

 

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